Show Navigation

It's so contrabassic

I'm Nelson. An inspiring young bass player from the ever humid state of Louisana
i-bang-bosendorfers:

Trivia: Bach had more children (20) than he had parallel fifths in his chorales (17).
© don’t shoot the pianist

i-bang-bosendorfers:

Trivia: Bach had more children (20) than he had parallel fifths in his chorales (17).

© don’t shoot the pianist

(via musicalandacademicblunderings)

castielsunderpants:

straighttohelvetica:

Easily the most horrifying line of dialogue I’ve ever heard in an animated movie.

NO BUT THIS WAS SUCH A GOOD GODDAMN MOVIE LIKE THE MUSIC IS FUN AND SUPERB THE CHARACTERS WERE REAL PEOPLE EVEN THE ANTAGONISTS THE WOMEN WERE GREAT IT WAS ALL GREAT. IT DOESNT MATTER IF YOURE JEWISH, CHRISTIAN, MUSLIM, ATHEIST, WHATEVER ELSE IT DOESNT MATTER ITS SUCH A GOOD MOVIE AND ITS LITERALLY ONLY 90 MINUTES OF YOUR DAY AND EXPERIENCE THIS HERE JUST CLICK IT LITERALLY IT WILL OPEN IN A NEW TAB GO WATCH. 

(via mlle-de-maupin)

(Source: , via pqwod)

immox:

I will always reblog this whenever it appears in my dashboard.

(Source: schweppesandcheshirecats, via mlle-de-maupin)

When the conductor searches out the fakers

jamescookjr:

“When I was auditioning for Joffrey. I only had one audition, and the producers and writers were laughing at my performance because I was being so snotty and arrogant. They found it comical. I thought that was good.” —Jack Gleeson

“Jack is gorgeous – a wonderfully sensitive, quiet, intelligent scholar. He’s the antithesis of that character.” —Michelle Fairley

"Jack, who plays Joffrey is such a lovely fellow." --Ian McElhinney

“He’s this really contemplative, erudite, really gorgeous, generous human being, and he plays Joffrey so well.  It’s very disturbing.” —Natalie Dormer

"Jack Gleeson, who plays Joffrey is an absolute sweetheart in real life, you know what I mean. He’s such a brilliant actor. I think he’s a genius." —Mark Addy

“He’s the most polite, lovely, intelligent person in the whole cast! He’s just so humble and everyone loves him. There’s nothing anyone can say bad about Jack. He literally just turns it on. As soon as they go, “Action!” he goes from lovely Jack to the most sadistic, horrible creep on television.” —Sophie Turner

“Jack Gleeson is really a very nice young man, charming and friendly.” —George R.R. Martin

"I kind of wish he would do more television interviews so that people can see what he’s really like, because there is so much hate for Joffrey, I feel protective of Jack now. If I were him, I’d be petrified that people would come up and slap me on the street! I should be his bodyguard." —Sophie Turner

"Jack is actually a very sweet boy and very bright, very intelligent young man with a natural talent." —Charles Dance

"Jack! He’s the coolest. He smokes a pipe, people. Talk about great acting for somebody who’s so different from the part he plays. I love that guy." —Peter Dinklage

(via mlle-de-maupin)

Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires.

John Steinbeck

A friend of mine posted this on facebook today. Realest shit… 

(via candidlycara)

(Source: dirtydarwin, via dbaldwin)

You sound like you play on an oboe made by Fisher Price

Musician Insults (via saxydrummajor)

(Source: soyoumusic, via csharp-melodicminor)

luthienesque:

just want to raise a glass for oberyn for being one of the few characters who is actually disgusted and enraged by rape and the rape culture of westeros while being non-white, non-het, and not a huge piece of crap towards bastards and non-noble ppl

(via charlizardusedfireblast)

(Source: khaleesiha, via some-bitch-just)

basedgosh:

tbh i hope pokemon is still a thing when i have kids
i want to show them it
then i want to crush their dreams by 6-0ing their whole team

(via charlizardusedfireblast)

therealshingetter1 asked: Excuse me, I saw your post on Greek lore inaccuracies, and I have a question. In the story explaining how Hades kidnaps Persephone, it's often called "The Rape of Persephone". Did this actually happen within context, or is it a mistranslation or an exaggeration or something else? It's been bugging me for years now and I'd appreciate your opinion on the matter.

lyriumpomegranates:

soloontherocks:

Rape in historical context means “kidnap”. Rape might have been involved, of course, possibly, but the name of the myth itself is not a reference to it.

For instance, the Rape of the Lock is a poem about someone stealing a lock of hair without permission from a maiden with beautiful hair.

I will point out that regardless of what might or might have happened beforehand, Haides is probably the best husband in all of Greek mythology. He has only two affairs — which let’s face it is pretty big for a Greek deity — and Persephone rules as his equal, not his inferior wife.

I’ll also point out that Persephone’s myth is a strong metaphor for a woman’s life — through the lens of an ancient Greek understanding of women, of course — and this is HUGELY important to context.

At the beginning she is nothing, a minor flower goddess, her entire identity merely “Demeter’s daughter”, even her name — Kore — just meant “the maiden.” Akin to how in childhood a daughter’s role was to be (quite literally, if you’re familiar with ancient Greek marriage law) owned by her parents. A daughter’s identity is as their parents’ daughter, nothing more. How many teenage girls have complained over the years as not being recognized as individuals with their own tastes and personality?

Then she gets carried off by a man who wishes to marry her…and I’ll point out in many more detailed versions of the myth Haides asks Zeus’ permission first. Which of course is a clear reference to a man meeting with a father to discuss the arranged marriage of the daughter. Mind you, ancient Greek wedding ceremony included a mock kidnapping. That was part of how they understood weddings to work. Also, of course, this was ancient Greece, women did not have much of a say in who they married.

THEN Persephone gets taken to the underworld — her husband’s “house” — and that’s when the most important part happens. Haides does not force her to eat the pomegranate seeds that doom her to spend half the year in the Underworld. She chooses to eat them. And if you think one of the most important goddesses in all of mythology was too stupid to know what that would mean, well, you probably need to rethink your understanding of Deity. But yes, Persephone CHOOSES to eat them.

Why? Because beforehand she was her mother’s daughter, Kore, the girl-child. After, she is Persephone, queen of the underworld and equal partner in her husband’s affairs. In myth she repeatedly overrules his decisions, even, or makes decisions for him. Her power only comes to her when she becomes an adult, through marriage. Mind you, the pomegranate is a classic strong symbol of female power and creation and mystery (not to mention, uh, blood). It’s overall a blatant representation of the tranformation from girlhood to womanhood. Yes, this was ancient Greece, so they assumed a woman would always wind up married. But in ancient Greece, a girl was without power. A married woman, however, basically ran the entire household and estate. The husband had shit to do, the wife was the one who commanded the servants and made business decisions for the household while the husband was out soldiering or whatever. A married woman was basically the most powerful thing a girl could possibly hope to be in ancient Greece.

Even without that ancient Greek view, it’s still a powerful metaphor for even modern womanhood. Because she CHOOSES to eat the pomegranates. She CHOOSES to become an adult.

Whatever happened with Haides before that, it’s irrelevant. Unimportant. Haides is important and good in her life because he assists in her transition to adulthood — he literally makes it possible — the way a good Greek husband does, and then proceeds to be an excellent husband, by mythology standards. She would never have become a woman under her mother’s roof.

Also, of course, there’s the whole “the myths are not meant to be taken literally in this religion and if you do the ancients will laugh at you as if you were a grownup who believed in Santa Claus” thing at play, so even if the story did include rape, it’s not literal, it’s a metaphor.

Mention because I’m going to answer this publicly and I don’t know if you follow me: therealshingetter1

If you’re still interested in the subject, elaphos is a Haides devotee.

I LOVE THIS POST. BLESS YOU OP

tuttofinito:

Truer words have never been spoken

tuttofinito:

Truer words have never been spoken

(via that-latin-student)